Witch and Wizard – James Patterson

Title: Witch and Wizard
Author: James Patterson
Published by: Grand Central Publishing
Publication date: 2009
Pages: 307
Genres: Adventure; Magic; Mystery
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought

 

Witch and Wizard

7/10

This review first appeared on the 31st January 2016 on The Guardian Childrens’ Book Website: here

You are holding an urgent and vital narrative that reveals the forbidden truth about our perilous times….

This is the astonishing testimonial of Wisty and Whit Allgood, a sister and brother who were torn from their family in the middle of the night, slammed into prison, and accused of being a witch and a wizard. Thousands of young people have been kidnapped; some have been accused; many others remain missing. Their fate is unknown, and the worst is feared—for the ruling regime will stop at nothing to suppress life and liberty, music and books, art and magic…and the pursuit of being a normal teenager.

Wisty is a fifteen year-old with no regard for rules, whilst White is her eighteen year-old brother suffering with depression as a result of his girlfriend, Celia, mysteriously vanishing.

The two siblings are living their normal lives when one night they are snatched from their homes in the dead of night, accused of having magical powers they didn’t even know they possessed (although their parents did).

Their parents hand them last gifts before they are separated and along the way discover powers which – besides scaring their kidnappers – doesn’t do anything to help their horrific situation.

This book by James Patterson is a wonderful book about adventure and magic, aimed at younger readers with easy to read, signature short chapters, making it very easy to be drawn into the story line.

The pace of the plot moves quickly and succinctly – finishing on a “to be continued” after 300 pages. This book had me on the edge of my seat in many places throughout, as in some sections it seemed like the two protagonists would be unable to escape the predicaments they constantly found themselves in.

For me, this book was the one that introduced me to the author James Patterson; you may know him as the author of the Maximum Ride series, or the Alex Cross detective books for adult readers. So I would highly recommended this book to get you hooked on a new author.

In my opinion, the short chapters are the reason his books are so addictive – this is not saying that Patterson’s character development and plot lines aren’t amazing, because they are – but that the short, snappy chapters ranging between half a page to three pages (as a general rule) means that the plot lines always travel at an astonishing pace, without feeling like the action is being rushed.

Many authors attempt to incorporate fast-moving plot but it feels rushed and unconvincing, but James Patterson is one author that adopts the fast plotline strategy in an effective manner.

Despite my heavy praise for the short chapters I hated the alternating narrators between Whit and Wisty because it broke up the plot, causing some confusion around what was happening.

I tend to become very much involved in the story so forget to read who is narrating the next section of the story, which is more so of a problem with short chapters as you are barely able to get involved with one character’s scenario before you are whisked to another part of the story with the other sibling.

Looking past this, though, this is merely a personal issue which other people may not have problems. However, all in all, I would definitely recommend this book!

Goodreads: My Profile

Amazon: Witch & Wizard

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